Aprilia RS-GP Exhaust Design

Posted on 11 Jun, 2015 by Scott Jones
Aprilia RS-GP exhaust

To conclude this series on the exhaust systems of current MotoGP factory bikes, here is a look at the Aprilia RS-GP exhaust. Previous posts in this series are the Yamaha YZR M1, the Honda RC213V, and the Ducati GP15, and the Suzuki GSX-RR.

This is the bike that gave me the idea for this series. When I noticed the complexity of the Aprilia system, it made me look more closely at the designs of the other factories and I began to notice the many differences in their approaches, even if the basics were similar.

The Aprilia RS-GP is a V-4, similar to the Ducati GP15 and the Honda RS213V. So it has two pipes at the front of the engine and two at the rear. But instead of routing each pair of exhaust pipes separately, Aprilia uses a design that defines a simple explanation such as 4 into 2 into 1. It starts off with 4 and ends up at 1, but in the middle it’s a bit more complicated.

Aprilia RS-GP end pipeFirst, the end of the pipe, which harkens back to last year’s Yamaha with the extended silencer. The diameter of the Aprilia’s single pipe section seems larger than those of the other factories’ final sections.

Aprilia RS-GP gateAs shown before here at PhotoGP, the Aprilia uses a gate to manage back pressure. Given the fact that all four of the RS-GP’s pipes end up in a single until, one gate can control back pressure for the entire system.

Aprilia RS-GP right sideViewed from the right side, the RS-GP routes two pipes around the left side of the oil sump, fairly standard from what we’ve seen, though we don’t know for sure what Suzuki does.

Aprilia RS-GP Valencia test 2014 rearThe rear two pipes do not proceed directly to the back as in Honda’s strategy. Instead, the two rear pipes turn back down toward the center to the bike. This is where things get really interesting.

More on the next page:

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